Is Oral Sex an Alternative

options

Teen oral sex means a teen using his or her mouth to sexually stimulate his or her partner’s sex organs. Some teens use oral sex as an alternative form of sex that preserves their virginity and does not cause pregnancy. Many teens also have the false impression that oral sex is safe sex.

Teen oral sex is not safe sex because, while oral sex cannot cause pregnancy, it is a common source of teen sexually transmitted diseases, especially since it is often performed without a condom. Many teens’ gums bleed, though this may not be obvious to them or their partners, which is one way that blood-born illnesses such as HIV may be spread by oral sex, even if contact with other bodily fluids, such as semen, is limited. Through contact with a teen’s genitals and bodily fluids, teen oral sex can spread other sexually transmitted diseases, such as:

  • Genital warts
  • Herpes
  • Hepatitis B
  • Syphilis
  • Chlamydia
  • Gonorrhea

Thousands of teens are infected with sexually transmitted diseases every day. Teen sexually transmitted diseases do not always have symptoms, so if a teen has had unprotected oral sex, he or she should see a doctor immediately. Some signs that a teen may have a sexually transmitted disease include:

  • Burning during urination
  • Pain during sex
  • Blisters, rashes, swelling or redness around or in the genitals, anus, mouth, or throat, especially after oral sex
  • Strong genital odors
  • Discharge from the penis or vagina
  • Flu-like symptoms such as fever, head or body aches, or fatigue

Abstinence from any sexual relations, including oral sex, is the only way for a teen to be safe from sexually transmitted diseases. If a teen is going to have oral sex, he or she should always use a condom, which reduces the risk of sexually transmitted diseases. Some teens may feel pressured by their partners not to use a condom for oral sex, but if a teen’s partner cares about him or her, he or she will also want to use a condom to reduce the risk of spreading sexually transmitted diseases. Condoms are available for a small price at stores, and are free at many clinics and health centers.

If a teen chooses to have oral sex, he or she should be very clear about his or her limits. No teen should ever be forced or pressured into performing sexual acts he or she does not want to do. No one who cares about a teen will pressure him or her into any sexual activity he or she does not want. Also, even if a teen agrees to oral sex, it does not mean that he or she is agreeing to any other sexual act. Any sexual contact that is not welcome is considered sexual battery or sexual assault, and can lead to criminal charges. The victim is never at fault in cases of sexual battery or sexual assault, and should seek counseling and medical care, if necessary.

Parents should begin early to teach their children and teens about values, relationships, and sex, so that when teens are faced with sexual situations they will be able to make healthy decisions about sex.

Is Oral Sex an Alternative Sources:

  • Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, “Primary HIV Infection Associated with Oral Transmission” [online]
  • 4Parents.gov, “The Facts” [online]
  • 4Parents.gov, “Abstinence” [online]
  • WebMD, “Your Guide to Sexually Transmitted Diseases” [online]
  • San Diego Police Department, “What College Men Should Known About Sexual Assault, Rape, and Sexual Battery” [online]