Teen Alternative Sex

Info

Teen alternative sex is teen involvement in sexual activities other than vaginal intercourse. It can include:

  • Oral sex
  • Anal sex
  • Petting, hand jobs, dry humping or any other stimulation of the partner’s genitals
  • Mutual masturbation
  • Necking or making out

Some teens choose alternative sex as a means of expressing sexuality while remaining a virgin. Also, many teens think alternative sex is safe sex, but this is a misunderstanding. None of these activities will cause pregnancy, as long as no seminal fluid gets into the female’s vagina, but these methods of teen alternative sex can spread some or all of the 25 or more known sexually transmitted diseases, and thousands of teens are infected with STDs every day.

Teen anal sex is a high-risk sexually activity for the spread of teen sexually transmitted diseases, including fatal STDs such as Hepatitis B and HIV. Many teens think that oral sex is safe, but it is a leading cause of teen STD infections. Even if contact with semen is avoided, many teens have undetected bleeding gums, which can spread HIV, and any contact with the genital area can spread STDs such as herpes and genital warts. Mutual masturbation is safer sex only if there is no close contact with the other teen’s body or bodily fluids. Necking can also spread some STDs such as syphilis.

Abstinence, which means refraining from all sexual relations, is the only way to prevent sexually transmitted diseases.

Any teen having sexual contact with another person, including oral sex, anal sex, or hand jobs, should use a condom. Condoms reduce, but do not stop, the spread of STDs. A sexually active teen, especially one who has had any form of unprotected sex, should be examined by a doctor for sexually transmitted diseases. Not all STDs have symptoms, but some signs of a teen STD can include:

  • Burning during urination
  • Pain during sex
  • Blisters, rashes, swelling or redness around or in the genitals, anus, mouth, or throat, especially after anal or oral sex
  • Strong genital odors
  • Discharge from the penis or vagina
  • Flu-like symptoms such as fever, head or body aches, or fatigue

No teen should ever be forced to perform any sexual act. Teens who are engaged in alternative sex must be very clear with their partners about their limits, and respect their partners’ limits. A teen should never do anything that the other person is uncomfortable with, or try to pressure the other person into trying other forms of alternative sex. If someone tries to pressure a teen into doing something he or she is not comfortable with, the teen should tell them no, get away from the person, and consider reporting the incident to parents, law enforcement officers, or other trusted adults. No one who cares about someone will try to force him or her into a sexual activity he or she doesn’t want. Any sexual contact that is not welcome is considered sexual battery or sexual assault, and can lead to criminal charges. The victim is never at fault in cases of sexual battery or sexual assault, and should seek counseling and medical care, if necessary.

Parents should talk to their teens about sexual activities and values, and encourage teens to make healthy and responsible choices about sex and sexuality.

Alternative Teen Sex Sources:

  1. Planned Parenthood, “Outercourse” [online]
  2. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, “Primary HIV Infection Associated with Oral Transmission” [online]
  3. 4Parents.gov, “The Facts” [online]
  4. 4Parents.gov, “Abstinence” [online]
  5. WebMD, “Your Guide to Sexually Transmitted Diseases” [online]
  6. San Diego Police Department, “What College Men Should Known About Sexual Assault, Rape, and Sexual Battery” [online]